Garlic Curing Instructions

Happy Monday!  As you will be receiving your share today before your newsletter, I thought I'd send along this blog post (below) about the garlic in today's share, in case you are wondering why it is unwashed or if you are wanting to cure it yourself! 

Thanks, and have a great Monday!

--
Teri Jenkins
CSA Team Lead

farm (902) 542-3277 ext. 2
cell (902) 698-9759
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TapRoot Farms
1736 Church Street
Port Williams, NS B0P 1T0

Guide to Curing Garlic

This week in the veggie share we are sending along some fresh garlic, which you can use up within a few weeks, OR you can choose to cure it yourself at home.  There is so much in the field that we worry about having enough space and resources to cure it all, so we thought in true CSA fashion this would be an opportunity for members to learn more about garlic and share some of the task of curing with the farm.

The garlic in your share this week has not been washed, which is an important step in terms of you having the option to cure it at home. Basically, all you need to do is tie and hang the heads in a dry, shady, well-ventilated area (OR, you can even lay them out one by one)  The kitchen is not an ideal place, but a well-ventilated porch or garage or shady area outside will do (& bonus if you are trying to keep stray vampires out of your yard!).

After a month (up to two months if it is very humid), the roots of the garlic will be stiff and the stem and head completely dry, and the garlic can be moved to a garlic keeping crock (if you have one), or a cool, dry, dark place, for winter use.  Depending on how well it is cured, the garlic can keep up to six months or even longer.

Make sure the heads are separated like in the photo to the right of the one below, to allow the most airflow possible.

 Here's more info and a link with more detailed instructions and explanations, for those of you who are interested: http://www.gardenbetty.com/2011/07/a-guide-to-curing-and-storing-garlic/#yxEqHqvF4qkIdZvS.99