TapRoot Farms / Blog / Category Recipes

Blog

Category Recipes

Eggplant Recipes from Facebook!

Posted on

I put a call out for your favouorite eggplant recipes last week on Facebook, here's the excellent results!  Thanks to everyone who shared a recipe, loads of great ideas here!  I am excited about cooking my eggplant... So many different ways to try it!

From Laura: Simple Baba Ganoush: http://minimalistbaker.com/simple-baba-ganoush/

From Justine: Eggplant is my very favorite! I like it just brushed with olive oil and grilled. TapRoot eggplant is so flavorful, sweet, and never bitter. I never even salt it beforehand.
With the grilled eggplant you can make a super simple baba with blending it with garlic, lemon juice, parsley, salt, and olive oil. SO GOOD!

From Rachel: We use it as a replacement for lasagna noodles - super tasty!

From Zoe: Ratatouille: I'm pretty sure this is the recipe I used last year at this time. So yummy, and a great way to use up a bunch of seasonal veggies!

http://m.allrecipes.com/recipe/18411/ratatouille

From Linda: Eggplant sliced into thin lengths, brushed with olive oil and grill. Stack a slice of tomato and mozzarella and some fresh basil on one side and fold the other half of the eggplant over, then wrap another slice of eggplant the opposite way. Sprinkle parmesan on the top and put back on the grill or broil in the oven until cheese melts. Ridiculously delicious!

From Kirsten: Eggplant is amazing! My favorite is to dip it in beaten egg, then roll in seasoned flour and fry in a little oil. Top with spaghetti sauce or chopped tomatoes and onion and some mozzarella!
Also great as beer batter fritters!

From Jennifer: We like it in baba ganoush or in roasted veg sauce (toss tomatoes, garlic, onion, eggplant, zucchini, peppers, herbs, etc. into a roasting pan with some olive oil, roast & blend with an immersion blender. We freeze it for a winter treat. It's yummy & easy and a great way to clean out any extra veggies that are kicking around.
We also make moussaka with ground beef or lamb. Mmmmm.

From Cheryl: eezy peezy recipe: grease a cookie pan with olive oil. Slice eggplant into 1/2 inch (12.7mm) slices and lay on pan. Add course ground sea salt & black pepper, pressed garlic & generously drizzle olive oil and balsamic vinegar. Preheat oven to 350o F (170 C). Bake for approximately 7 minutes EACH side. (depending on your oven).

From Ruth: One of my favourite recipes is this one for Griddled Eggplant Roll Ups:

http://recipesfrom4everykitchen.blogspot.ca/2006/10/griddled-eggplant-roll-ups-with-feta.html

From Christine: Bharta: I have used this one from the original book for years. Nothing beats smoked eggplant - that's what charcoal grills are for, in my opinion:

http://dinnercoop.cs.cmu.edu/dinnercoop/Recipes/karen/Bharta.html

From Meagan:

I found this delicious looking recipe for eggplant that I plan on making
and thought you could share it with the members--  the original had
some steps missing, so I'll just type it out how I
plan on making it:

Eggplant Parmesan Burgers
Ingredients:

1 eggplant of a fairly good size
1 cup all-purpose flour
3 eggs, beaten with 3tbsp milk
2 cups bread crumbs with 1tsp each fresh or dried parsley and thyme
1/2 cup finely shredded parmesan cheese (canned is fine if this is all you have)
1 lb. fresh mozzarella cheese, sliced into rounds
Vegetable oil, for frying
2 cups tomato sauce (I use a can of either store bought or homemade
plain tomato sauce that I have added to a diced onion that has been
browned with some herbs on the stove.)
Buns
Any other burger toppings you like! I think fresh basil, spinach, any
type of lettuce or sprouts, even shredded carrot would be delicious.

Directions:

Slice the eggplants lengthwise into ½-inch thick slices - Leave as a
whole slice if you have buns that size, if not just cut out or use a
cookie cutter to bring it down to the size of the bun you have.

Sprinkle the eggplant with 1½ teaspoons salt and let it drain in a
colander over a bowl or in the sink for 45 minutes to remove excess
moisture.

Bread the eggplant by first rinsing off the salt and blotting with
paper towel. Next mix together the breadcrumbs, herbs and parmesan
cheese. Dip the eggplant first in the flour, then the eggs and then
the breadcrumb mixture.

Heat a large skillet over medium heat and add about a half inch of oil
(I prefer peanut or safflower oil). Pan-fry the breaded eggplant in
batches for 2 to 3 minutes, flipping them once until both sides are
golden brown. Remove the cooked eggplant and immediately transfer  to
a paper towel-lined plate. Continue the pan-frying process, changing
the oil as necessary, until all of the rounds are cooked.

Halve your rolls and add 1 tablespoon of tomato sauce to the bottoms
of the rolls. Stack an eggplant round atop the sauce, top it with
another tablespoon of sauce and a piece of sliced mozzarella. Repeat
the assembling process with all of the buns, transferring them to a
cookie sheet lined with parchment paper.

Turn your broiler to high and carefully slide the cookie sheet under
the broiler just long enough until the cheese melts. Top with any
other toppings you like and then devour! 

Jennifer and Allison say: Eggplant parmesan is one of my favorites.

 



Berry Grunt Recipe

Posted on

Hiya!  We enjoyed a successful corn boil and blueberry grunt event on Saturday, and a few members asked for the recipes, so here they are:

From Simply in Season Cookbook:

From Out of Old Nova Scotia Kitchens Cookbook (Meagan and Tim used this recipe):

Salad Dressing: Equal parts (1 cup) high-quality extra virgin olive oil and (1 cup) balsamic vinegar, (1/2 pint) raspberries, crushed, and salt and pepper to taste-- You can adjust the quantities as needed to make as little or as much as you want.  Simple and delicious!



Real. Authentic. Tabbouleh Recipe

Posted on

As you may know, Jill is our "herbie" at the farm.  We consult once in a while about what herbs are available for the CSA.  When Jill mentioned parsley this week, I asked her if she could make sure to share a recipe for tabbouleh with me for the newsletter.  She did me much better than simply linking to the first Google result-- Here's a tabbouleh recipe from Jill's friend Alia's Palestinian Grandmother Alya Awdi.  Recipes like this are solid gold-- I love when people share traditional recipes that they've been making for years and likely don't even have written down!

As she forwarded the email, I am sharing a little more than just the recipe, because I think it's cute, and adds to the special-ness of this recipe!

J: Do you think that Sitto would share her tabbouleh recipe for next weeks TapRoot newsletter?

A: Sure! she was so stoked when I called and told her you wanted her recipe!
Here goes my best translation:
 
2-3 bunches parsley washed really well, chopped fine fine, soaked in water 5 mins set aside
4 tomatoes washed really well, chopped small 
1 small onion chopped small small
mix together
add  some salt,citric acid (can be bought at mid east centre) -lemon if you don't have it and a sprinkle of cumin- all to your taste.
 
Then add 1/2 cup bourgul (bulgur) fine, washed well but not cooked, add to mix 
finish with a big splash of olive oil 
eat and enjoy!! 
 


Cucumber and Red Onion Salad - Shared by Angela

Posted on

Passing on a quick recipe I tried last night with cucumber, there are lots of them right now...I can't take credit for it but it was tasty.  I did reduce the salt but other than that made as is.
 

Cucumber and Red Onion Salad

 

After much trial and error, we decided that we liked our cucumber best sliced thickly and on a diagonal. This kept it from getting soggy, and was pretty as well. But do that you like best. The longer you chill the more the flavors will meld, but the cucumbers will continue to soften. The cucumber will also release juice because of the salt in the dressing. But it’s no problem. just toss again with all the liquid right before serving.

3 large cucumbers, peeled, seeded, and cut into 1/2 inch pieces on a diagonal.

1/2 to 1 red onion, peeled and thinly sliced

1 teaspoon celery seed

4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

3 tablespoons white wine vinegar (you could also use lemon juice, champagne vinegar, or apple cider vinegar)

1 teaspoon Dijon style mustard

1 teaspoon sea salt

2-3 garlic cloves, finely minced or put through a garlic press

1-In a medium size bowl combine your cucumber and red onion slices.

2- In a small bowl combine the rest of the ingredients. Pour over cucumber and onion mixture and toss to coat. Chill for a few hours for flavors to meld. Mix right before serving and enjoy.


The Nourishing Gourmet

 



Summer Pickling!

Posted on

I can probably count the number of times we had store-bought jam, pickles or salsa in the fridge in my house growing up on one hand; every summer my family (just my mother and I as I got older and more interested in food preservation, and my brother got less interested) would go picking a variety of berries - strawberries and raspberries mostly - and and then make dozens of jars of jam both to eat and give away. When we moved into a house with a yard that allowed for it we started growing tomatoes, cucumbers, dill and (for the first time this year!) garlic for making our own homemade pickles and salsa. Since becoming an employee of TapRoot and after not being able to garden at all this year save for a small flower box and grow bag of tomatoes, I decided to do my pickling with produce from our lovely farm :).

This year at TapRoot we currently have two different pickling packs available (for dilly beans or cucumbers, as well as bulk cucumbers for bread and butter pickles) and hopefully more variety coming soon! I got myself one of each of the pickling packs and grabbed a couple of zukes and carrots that I had in my fridge from the weeks shares to make a couple jars of "mixed" pickles.

 
First assemble all your ingredients, I used:
  • One dilly cucumber pickling pack containing 10 pounds cucumbers, two heads of garlic and a bunch of dill
  • One dilly bean pack containing the same, replacing the cucumbers with 5 lbs of yellow beans
  • 10 small carrots  *
  • One green and one yellow zucchini *
  • Dried cayenne peppers *
  • Red pepper flakes *
  • Mixed peppercorns *
  • Fresh thyme and basil *
  • Bernardin pickle crisp - my mom and I use this because we highly value crispy pickles. Mushy = yucky and usually if they're not crispy we end up tossing them anyways.
*These are all optional - I wanted to make some pretty mixed pickle jars for Christmas gifts*
 
Next we sanitized the jars
There's a couple ways to sanitize your jars - we used our canning pot of boiling water since we had it out already for processing. 
While the jars sanitized we scrubbed the cucumbers and let them sit in cold icy water which is supposed to help them retain their crispiness. We also washed and trimmed the beans and prepped the rest of the veggies.
 
Put our spices in the jars
We use a dill flower and a good little bundle of the leaves - some people use the stem but we don't usually.
For four jars of the beans I used a whole dried cayenne pepper (Thanks, Teri!) and for the other four I used 1/2 tsp of multicoloured peppercorns and 1/4 tsp of dried red pepper flakes.
For my mixed pickles I also did half with cayennes, half with peppers and flakes and I also added fresh thyme and basil from the garden. I put one whole (or two pieces depending on their size) garlic clove in every jar.
 
Packed in the veggies
 Some of my beans are a bit long - you want them trimmed to the neck of the jar. You pack in your veggies so there is no wiggle room, but do not crush the beans or other veg! 
 
Poured in the brine, placed the sanitized snap lids and rings on and processed the jars for ten minutes.
 I use a 1:1 ratio of vinegar:water for my brine. You can make a milder brine, even a sweet one for the mixed pickles but I love super salty-vinegary pickles. After pouring in the brine you want to tap it on the counter or poke around the veg with a skewer/chop stick to ensure there are no air bubbles.