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TapRoot Dill Pickle Packs - Two ways

Posted on by Justine Mentink

This year we are including both a recipe for vinegar canned dill pickles as well as a lacto ferments pickle. Lacto ferments pickles are packed with probiotics and are easy to make, but the process takes some time to get used to! My mother makes ferments so I've never had to make them, as I have a steady supply whenever I want, but this year we did try our hand at it. Our pickles are about a week in, and although we have already been taken them out to try and use in sandwiches they aren't done yet. It's less of an exact science and more of an art form, with practice making you more comfortable with the process I would imagine. My brother, who gets a full monty, always has at least one batch of ferments on the go. Last time we were over we have fermented garlic scapes with our meal. Getting used to this process will serve you well when we get into storage vegetables, as cabbage and carrots ferment beautifully.

A note that our dill pickles this year aren't as green as they usually are. Josh says because of the rain that we had the nitrogen get washed away, and this makes the pickles more yellow. They are still fresh and crunchy, but aesthetically they look a bit different.


 Lacto Fermented Dill Pickles

Lacto Fermented pickles are a great way to make dill pickles, as a bonus these pickles will be packed with healthy probiotics.

 

You can use a glass jar or food grade plastic bucket.

 

To make a gallon jar of pickles you will need:

A gallon Jar

A gallon of non chlorinated water

97 g sea salt

Pickling cucumbers

Garlic

Dill

Grape leaves (optional, but makes a more crunchy pickle)

 

Wash the pickles, and place in the jar along with the garlic and dill flowers. Add the brine so that it covers the pickles. To keep the pickles from floating to the top, you can fill a ziplock with brine and put it on top. Cover the jar with a tea towel and place the jar in a room temperature location for 3 day to 2 weeks, trying the pickles every few days until they are to the tangy-ness you want. A white yeasty foam will form on top and is perfectly normal and not something to worry about. When the pickles are 'done' you can skim off the white foam (optional), and put into the fridge. Eat right away, or store in a fridge or root cellar for months and enjoy them all winter long.


Vinegar Packed Dill Pickle

S

Here's what you'll need:

-8 quart jars

-8 lid flats and screw tops

-4 cups vinegar

-1 cup kosher or pickling salt

-A TapRoot Pickle Pack (10lbs pickling cucumbers, 2 heads garlic, 8 dill flowers)

Step 1: Sanitize the jars.  I don't have any fancy equipment, and just put my jars open side down in a big roasting pan filled with a little water with the oven on about 350 degrees.  A jar lifter is a huge help getting the jars back out and avoiding burns while doing so!S  See photo>>

Step 2: Make the brine.  Mix 4 cups vinegar (I use regular vinegar, if you're using the pickling vinegar it is stronger and will require less vinegar and more water for this recipe), 12 cups water, and 1 cup salt in a pot.  Bring to a boil and maintain heat so that it is just below a simmer (not boiling, still hot and steaming).

Step 3: Place the lid flats in another small pot of almost boiling water (This sanitizes them as well and softens the rubber so you get a good seal.  Always use new flats, it's just a good practice, and saves the disappointment of seals not holding)

SStep 4: Prepare the cucumbers, garlic, and dill while everything is heating up.  The dill should be washed and divided into the amount you want in each jar (I use a stem or two and 1 flower head per jar).  The garlic should be removed from it's paper wrapper (I put one clove per jar, some people like more, so depending on your taste).  Both the stem end and the end of the cucumber should be trimmed off, and then they should be washed in cold water.  Depending on how dirty they are, sometimes I scrub each one.  Poke through any larger cucumbers with a sharp knife to help them pickle uniformly.   All this trimming and scrubbing may seem like a lot of work, but it goes fast and is totally worth it in the final product.

Step 5: Start packing the jars.  Remove the hot jar with a jar lifter, and continuing to hold the jar with the lifter, put in dill and garlic .  Start with larger cucumbers, lining them up along the bottom layer, and the smaller ones are great for packing in the top. S

Step 6: Fill jar as much as you can with cucumbers, and then fill to the bottom of the jar rim with brine.  Wipe the rim to ensure no excess brine is between the seal and the glass.  Take out a flat from the hot water, place on top, and tighten screw lid to finger tight (you'll regret it if you tighten it too much at this point). 

Step 7: Place jars in a water bath, and fill the canner (or a large pot with a lid) with water to top of jar lids. Put lid on water bath canner and bring water to a boil. Just as the water begins to boil, tuen off heat and remove jars. Place jars on a clean towel and let set for 24 hours. So long as everything has been hot along the way, you shouldn't have any problems with seals. The flat will suck inwards and sometimes even make a "POP!" when they seal.

 

You can eat these right away as young dills, or store for a later time and more intense pickle flavour!  

The TapRoot Pickle Pack was awesome.  The perfect amount of everything for this recipe, the cucumbers are a great size, and there's the variety you need in sizing for making dills (some big ones, some small ones, and everything in between).

S


Voila!!

Good luck with your batch of TapRoot Pickles!

 

 

 

 



Spring! Time for Sunchokes aka. Jerusalem Artichokes

Posted on by Justine Mentink

Sunchokes aka. Jerusalem Artichokes, are a relative of the sunflower, and are not an artichoke at all. They do have a mild artichoke heart taste to them, and are starchy, but have no starch in them. They store their carboyhydrates as inulin, a great source of fiber and a prebiotic! They don't take being boiled very well, becoming mushy, but roasted or steamed they keep their shape beautifully.

Sunchokes can be eaten raw, but because of the inulin (that isn't digestible) for some they cause stomach upsets. Start small eating raw, or steam, roast, add to mashed potatoes, or shave thinly and fry to make crisp sunchoke chips.

We dig our sunchokes in the spring and as we are harvesting them we leave all the small tubers in the ground, taking only what we need for the CSA and our wholesale customers. What is left in the ground will grow up this summer and multiply underground. Next spring we will then go through the same process. We have three different sunchoke patches on the farm.

Storage: Store your sunchokes out of the bag in a cool, dry place, or in the crisper wrapped in a tea towel or paper towel to absorb excess moisture. As they were dug on the weekend, they can be stored for 3 weeks in this manner.

Try one of the recipes below, or let us know how you ate your sunchokes and we will share with the rest of the CSA members.


Sunchoke Latkes with Poached Eggs

Sunchoke, Parsnip, potato Latkes with a poached egg. Great for breakfast, lunch or supper.

You will need:
227g sunchokes
227g yukon gold potatoes
113g parsnip
1 egg
2 Tbsp flour
1 Tbsp chives plus more for serving
salt, pepper and oil
2 poached eggs, for serving
hot sauce, for serving
For the full recipe click on the picture.

Roasted Jerusalem Artichokes with feta and garlic dill butter

This recipe from Viktoria's Table is one that she makes with either potatoes or sunchokes. Ours are not as large as the one in the picture (ours must be a different variety), but by slicing then length ways you should be able to get large pieces to make this recipe with.

You will need: 
1lb Jersalem Artichokes 
1tsp olive oil
salt and pepper
2Tbsp butter
2 garlic cloves
2-3 tsp dill
a handful of crumbled feta
For the full recipe click on the picture.


Sunday Soup

Posted on by Justine Mentink

This weekend it was 11 am and we needed lunch, plus leftovers for lunch for some of the week. Soup is always a hit with my family so I got what was on hand and started. This simple soup lends itself to many different vegetables. I like it with mushrooms added at the end but we didn't have any this time.

Quick vegetable lentil soup:

I started by chopping up a few leeks and an onion.

That went into a large pot with a few glugs of olive oil and a little butter.

While that was cooking I got the veggies prepped.

I peeled the carrots and turnip then cubed them. I trimmed the brussels sprouts, halved them, then sliced them thinly.

Once the leeks and onions were cooked down, I added the vegetables, as well as one and a half quarts of canned tomatoes (I happen to have TapRoot tomatoes I canned in the summer), and about a quart stock (veggie, chicken, or beef). I also added one of my favorite fast cooking legumes, red lentils. 

I find red lentils lend such a nice consistency (and protein) to soup, they break down a bit, but still hold some shape. Plus they cook in 20 or so minutes.

I added some salt and pepper, frozen kale and basil from the freezer, and let it simmer for 20 or so minutes. 

We ate the soup with some grated parmesan cheese and miso mixed in at the end.

Gilbert, half asleep from his nap, ate two bowls full.

 

 Happy Soup Eating!

 



Warm red cabbage with bacon

Posted on

Thank you to CSA member Glennis Smith for this fabulous recipe!
 

Warm Red Cabbage with Bacon 

Saute:
1 shallot, leek or bunch of green onion (I have used any of these; they all work) in a deep fry pan with a little olive oil until lightly brown.  

Add in: 
6 cups of chopped red cabbage (long shreds look the best)

Drizzle with a little more oil and toss with tongs until it just begins to limp a bit but still crisp -- about 5 minutes 

Season with coarsely grated salt and fresh ground pepper while tossing. 

Warm: 
4 Tablespoons balsamic vinegar
2 Tablespoons oil 
Add in a handful of raisins or cranberries in the warm vinegar 
Let sit for five minutes. 

Add to the cabbage mixture: 
1/2 cup or more of crumbled bacon
1/2 cup chopped toasted whole almonds  (or other nuts if preferred)

Finally, add the warm balsamic vinegar to the cabbage mixture and toss through.  


This is so good, even left over and re-heated. 

Tip: I used the crumbled real Bacon from Costco which I keep in the freezer for recipes. Easy peasy…

Glennis Smith 

 



Eggplant Recipes from Facebook!

Posted on

I put a call out for your favouorite eggplant recipes last week on Facebook, here's the excellent results!  Thanks to everyone who shared a recipe, loads of great ideas here!  I am excited about cooking my eggplant... So many different ways to try it!

From Laura: Simple Baba Ganoush: http://minimalistbaker.com/simple-baba-ganoush/

From Justine: Eggplant is my very favorite! I like it just brushed with olive oil and grilled. TapRoot eggplant is so flavorful, sweet, and never bitter. I never even salt it beforehand.
With the grilled eggplant you can make a super simple baba with blending it with garlic, lemon juice, parsley, salt, and olive oil. SO GOOD!

From Rachel: We use it as a replacement for lasagna noodles - super tasty!

From Zoe: Ratatouille: I'm pretty sure this is the recipe I used last year at this time. So yummy, and a great way to use up a bunch of seasonal veggies!

http://m.allrecipes.com/recipe/18411/ratatouille

From Linda: Eggplant sliced into thin lengths, brushed with olive oil and grill. Stack a slice of tomato and mozzarella and some fresh basil on one side and fold the other half of the eggplant over, then wrap another slice of eggplant the opposite way. Sprinkle parmesan on the top and put back on the grill or broil in the oven until cheese melts. Ridiculously delicious!

From Kirsten: Eggplant is amazing! My favorite is to dip it in beaten egg, then roll in seasoned flour and fry in a little oil. Top with spaghetti sauce or chopped tomatoes and onion and some mozzarella!
Also great as beer batter fritters!

From Jennifer: We like it in baba ganoush or in roasted veg sauce (toss tomatoes, garlic, onion, eggplant, zucchini, peppers, herbs, etc. into a roasting pan with some olive oil, roast & blend with an immersion blender. We freeze it for a winter treat. It's yummy & easy and a great way to clean out any extra veggies that are kicking around.
We also make moussaka with ground beef or lamb. Mmmmm.

From Cheryl: eezy peezy recipe: grease a cookie pan with olive oil. Slice eggplant into 1/2 inch (12.7mm) slices and lay on pan. Add course ground sea salt & black pepper, pressed garlic & generously drizzle olive oil and balsamic vinegar. Preheat oven to 350o F (170 C). Bake for approximately 7 minutes EACH side. (depending on your oven).

From Ruth: One of my favourite recipes is this one for Griddled Eggplant Roll Ups:

http://recipesfrom4everykitchen.blogspot.ca/2006/10/griddled-eggplant-roll-ups-with-feta.html

From Christine: Bharta: I have used this one from the original book for years. Nothing beats smoked eggplant - that's what charcoal grills are for, in my opinion:

http://dinnercoop.cs.cmu.edu/dinnercoop/Recipes/karen/Bharta.html

From Meagan:

I found this delicious looking recipe for eggplant that I plan on making
and thought you could share it with the members--  the original had
some steps missing, so I'll just type it out how I
plan on making it:

Eggplant Parmesan Burgers
Ingredients:

1 eggplant of a fairly good size
1 cup all-purpose flour
3 eggs, beaten with 3tbsp milk
2 cups bread crumbs with 1tsp each fresh or dried parsley and thyme
1/2 cup finely shredded parmesan cheese (canned is fine if this is all you have)
1 lb. fresh mozzarella cheese, sliced into rounds
Vegetable oil, for frying
2 cups tomato sauce (I use a can of either store bought or homemade
plain tomato sauce that I have added to a diced onion that has been
browned with some herbs on the stove.)
Buns
Any other burger toppings you like! I think fresh basil, spinach, any
type of lettuce or sprouts, even shredded carrot would be delicious.

Directions:

Slice the eggplants lengthwise into ½-inch thick slices - Leave as a
whole slice if you have buns that size, if not just cut out or use a
cookie cutter to bring it down to the size of the bun you have.

Sprinkle the eggplant with 1½ teaspoons salt and let it drain in a
colander over a bowl or in the sink for 45 minutes to remove excess
moisture.

Bread the eggplant by first rinsing off the salt and blotting with
paper towel. Next mix together the breadcrumbs, herbs and parmesan
cheese. Dip the eggplant first in the flour, then the eggs and then
the breadcrumb mixture.

Heat a large skillet over medium heat and add about a half inch of oil
(I prefer peanut or safflower oil). Pan-fry the breaded eggplant in
batches for 2 to 3 minutes, flipping them once until both sides are
golden brown. Remove the cooked eggplant and immediately transfer  to
a paper towel-lined plate. Continue the pan-frying process, changing
the oil as necessary, until all of the rounds are cooked.

Halve your rolls and add 1 tablespoon of tomato sauce to the bottoms
of the rolls. Stack an eggplant round atop the sauce, top it with
another tablespoon of sauce and a piece of sliced mozzarella. Repeat
the assembling process with all of the buns, transferring them to a
cookie sheet lined with parchment paper.

Turn your broiler to high and carefully slide the cookie sheet under
the broiler just long enough until the cheese melts. Top with any
other toppings you like and then devour! 

Jennifer and Allison say: Eggplant parmesan is one of my favorites.